Case Study 1 - Tableau data visualization vs a "rows and columns" report: an apples to apples data comparison

The best way to compare a Tableau visualization against a "rows and columns" report is to do it side-by-side. The visualization was created in seconds; the simple report took longer. Take a look, the contrast is dramatic. Both the visualization and the report show product type sales by state, using the exact same data source. Which one is easier to understand? Which one would you like to see at the start, or end, of your work day?

    This report was created in about 15 minutes.                                                         This Tableau data visualization was authored in seconds.
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Take 15 seconds to study the report then, answer these questions.
            Which 5 states have least sales?
            Which 5 states have the most sales?
            What is the best-selling product type?
            In which states is no product being sold?
Not so easy.

Take another 15 seconds to study the Tableau data visualization and answer the same questions.
            Which 5 states have the least sales?
            Which 5 states have the most sales?
            Judging by the pie wedges, what is the best-selling product type?
            In which states are no products being sold?
Easy.

An over-simplified comparison? No, honestly, it's not. This is an apples to apples, head to head comparison of standard rows and columns versus visualization. Standard reports have their place - they always will. Data visualization, as shown here with Tableau, is a whole new way of seeing and understanding data for everything from healthcare to energy, from agriculture to aircraft building, from banking to public sector.

With Tableau, you create visualizations that show information in a way that's intuitive, easy to grasp and understand. Take the above map for example. States, as we know them, aren't positioned in alphabetical order, they appear in their geographic locations across the US. Portions of sales aren't lines at all, they're "portions," just like wedges in a pie.

This example uses one of Tableau's many chart types. Think about the reports your organization's decision-makers rely on. Then imagine the possibilities with Tableau.

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